Long-Term Effects of Alternative Residue Management Practices on Soil Water Retention in a Wheat-Soybean, Double-Crop System in Eastern Arkansas

Soil water retention is a critical aspect of agricultural management, especially in areas such as the Lower Mississippi River Alluvial Valley that face potential water shortages in the near future. Previous studies have linked changes in soil water retention characteristics to agricultural management practices, especially as they affect the accumulation of soil organic matter (SOM). Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the relationship between soil water potential and gravimetric soil water content in the top 7.5 cm as affected by nitrogen (N) fertilization/residue level (high and low), residue burning (burning and non-burning), tillage (conventional and no-tillage), and irrigation (irrigated and non-irrigated) after 12 complete cropping cycles in a wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)-soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], double-crop production system in the Delta region of eastern Arkansas using soil wetting curves. The soil investigated was a Calloway silt loam (fine silty, mixed, active, thermic Glossaquic Fraglossudalf). The slope characterizing the relationship between the natural logarithm of the soil water potential and the gravimetric soil water content was only affected (P 0.12 g·g-1. Understanding the ways in which alternative residue management practices affect soil water retention characteristics is an important component of conserving irrigation water resources.

来源: Long-Term Effects of Alternative Residue Management Practices on Soil Water Retention in a Wheat-Soybean, Double-Crop System in Eastern Arkansas

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