Culture Mixed-Sex and Monosex of Tilapia in Ponds in Mexico City

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http://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperInformation.aspx?PaperID=53772#.VNHZXSzQrzE

In this study, the growth of Oreochromis niloticus both mixed sex and males sexually reversed were analyzed in concrete ponds in the FES Zaragoza, UNAM, under the environmental conditions of the Mexico City. The experiment was carried from May to November 2013, in two concrete ponds of 50 m2. Similar feeding regime and stocking density of fish were maintained for the culture systems. Different growth parameters like body weight, length, daily weight gain (DWG), specific growth rate (SGR), feed conversion rate (FCR), Fulton’s condition index (K) and survival were analyzed during six months culture period. It was found that culture with monosex males tilapias yielded the highest weight, length, DWG and SGR compared to mixed sex populations tilapias. Water quality was monitored along the experiment. Based on the results, there were statistically significant differences in size (W = 20942.5, p < 0.05) and weight (W = 21413.0, p < 0.05) between the divisions of the pond. The initial total length used was 1.2 cm and ended with 20.4 cm for monosex males, higher than mixed-sex population. The initial average body weight of the fish was 0.21 g and they recorded 192.2 g at the end of culture for monosex males. The weight-length relationship for both populations of fish was positive allometric. The percentage gain in body weight and total length averaged were 150% and 31.8% respectively. Specific growth rates in weight and length for monosex males were higher than mixed-sex population. Daily weight gain and size was similar in both populations. The FCR had a mean value of 1.9:1 for monosex males and condition factor (K) had an average of 1.45 for mixed-sex population. Water quality indicated good oxygenation (>5 mg/L), warm water (>20°C), productive (<100 mg/L CaCO3) and slightly basic (pH > 8). Acceptable growth of fish and a yield of 3 ton/ha/6 months were obtained in both two ponds; therefore, the culture of tilapia under conditions of Mexico City was recommended.

Cite this paper

Gómez-Márquez, J. , Peña-Mendoza, B. , Alejo-Plata, M. and Guzmán-Santiago, J. (2015) Culture Mixed-Sex and Monosex of Tilapia in Ponds in Mexico City. Agricultural Sciences, 6, 187-194. doi: 10.4236/as.2015.62017.

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Research on American English Translation of Chinese Signs in Baoding from the Perspective of Cultural Differences

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http://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperInformation.aspx?PaperID=53554#.VMiL0SzQrzE

Author(s)

ABSTRACT

This thesis aims at analyzing the American English translation of Chinese signs in Baoding from the perspective of cultural differences. The thesis researches on signs translation from a new angle by separating American English translation from British English translation and puts special emphasis on American English signs translation, which may be helpful to the standardization of signs translation in China. Through digging out the cultural differences from different thinking mode, value, and usage of the words, the author tries to show how to make the translation purer and tries to revise the translation.

Cite this paper

Zhao, N. , Ma, R. and Du, X. (2015) Research on American English Translation of Chinese Signs in Baoding from the Perspective of Cultural Differences. Open Journal of Modern Linguistics, 5, 1-5. doi: 10.4236/ojml.2015.51001.

References

[1] Fan, X. Y. (2014). On Signs Translation from Cross-Cultural Communication Aspect. Crazy English Teachers, 1, 179.
[2] Hu, T. S., & Yu, Z. L. (2012). On C-E Signs Translation with the Strategy of Domestication and Foreginization. Journal of Changchun University of Science and Technology (Social Sciences Edition), 1, 87-89.
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[5] Xiao, S. (2014). Mis-Translation of Signs in Hainan from the Aspect of Skopos theory. Humanities & Social Sciences Journal of Hainan University, 5, 121-125.
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[8] Zhao, N., Shen, B. G., & Wang, Z. L. (2010). Research on Culture Communication and Signs Translation. Writer Magazine, 6, 184-185.                                                                                                       eww150128lx

The Role of Culture in Foreign Direct Investment and Trade: Expectations from the GLOBE Dimensions of Culture

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http://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperInformation.aspx?PaperID=53347#.VL71KSzQrzE

ABSTRACT

This paper offers qualitative analysis of the impact of culture on international business. In particular, we discuss the potential impact of each of the nine cultural dimensions that were established by the Global Leadership and Organizational Behavior Effectiveness Research Program, which is led by Robert J. House, on the decision to trade with or invest in another country. The analysis finds characterizations of source- and destination-country are important for each dimension when deciding between trade and FDI. Given the potentially conflicting recommendations, the dimensions are placed in a hierarchy to distinguish those most in need of consideration from those of secondary import.

Cite this paper

Mac-Dermott, R. and Mornah, D. (2015) The Role of Culture in Foreign Direct Investment and Trade: Expectations from the GLOBE Dimensions of Culture. Open Journal of Business and Management, 3, 63-74. doi: 10.4236/ojbm.2015.31007.

References

[1] Hufbauer, G.C., Moran, T.H., Oldenski, L. and Vieiro, M. (2013) Outward Foreign Direct Investment and US Exports, Jobs, and R&D: Implications for US Policy. Peterson Institute for International Economics, Washington DC.
[2] Moran, T.H. and Oldenski, L. (2013) Foreign Direct Investment in the United States: Benefits, Suspicions, and Risks with Special Attention to FDI from China. Peterson Institute for International Economics, Washington DC.
[3] Barro, R.J. and McCleary, R. (2003) Religions and Economic Growth. The National Bureau of Economic Research, Working Paper No. 9682.
[4] Tabellini, G. (2010) Culture and Institutions: Economic Development in the Regions of Europe. Journal of the European Economic Association, 8, 677-716.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1542-4774.2010.tb00537.x
[5] Easterly, W. (2006) Social Cohesion, Institutions and Growth. Center for Global Development, Working Paper No. 94.
[6] Linders, G., Slangen, A., de Groot, H. and Beugelsdijk, S. (2005) Cultural and Institutional Determinants of Bilateral Trade Flows. Tinbergen Institute Discussion Paper, TI 2005-074/3.
[7] Tadesse, B. and White, R. (2007) Cultural Distance as a Determinant of Bilateral Trade Flows: Do Immigrants Counter the Effect of Cultural Differences? Applied Economic Letters, 17, 147-152.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13504850701719983
[8] Cyrus, T. (2012) Cultural Distance and Bilateral Trade. Global Economy Journal, 12.
[9] Kogut, B. and Singh, H. (1988) The Effect of National Culture on the Choice of Entry Mode. Journal of International Business Studies, 19, 411-432. http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/palgrave.jibs.8490394
[10] Benito, G. and Gripsrud, G. (1992) The Expansion of Foreign Direct Investments: Discrete Rational Location Choices or a Cultural Learning Process? Journal of International Business Studies, 23, 461-476. http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/palgrave.jibs.8490275
[11] Chakrabarti, R., Gupta-Mukherjee, S. and Jayaraman, N. (2009) Mars-Venus Marriages: Culture and Cross-Border M&A. Journal of International Business Studies, 40, 216-236.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/jibs.2008.58
[12] Eichengreen, B. and Irwin, D. (1998) The Role of History in Bilateral Trade Flows. In: Frankel, J.A., Ed., The Regionalization of the World Economy, University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 33-62.
[13] De Groot, H.L., Linders, G.J., Rietveld, P. and Subramanian, U. (2004) The Institutional Determinants of Bilateral Trade Patterns. Kyklos, 57, 103-123.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.0023-5962.2004.00245.x
[14] Head, T. and Sorensen, P. (2005) Attracting Foreign Direct Investment: The Potential Role of National Culture. Journal of American Academy of Business, 6, 305-308.
[15] House, R.J., Hanges, P.J., Javidan, M., Dorfman, P.W. and Gupta, V. (2004) Culture, Leadership and Organizations: The GLOBE Study of 62 Societies. Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks.
[16] Hofstede, G. (2001) Culture’s Consequences. Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks.
[17] Triandis, H.C. (1995) Individualism and Collectivism. Westview Press, Boulder.                  eww150121lx

The Role of Culture in Foreign Direct Investment and Trade: Expectations from the GLOBE Dimensions of Culture

Read  full  paper  at:

http://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperInformation.aspx?PaperID=53347#.VL3NLCzQrzE

ABSTRACT

This paper offers qualitative analysis of the impact of culture on international business. In particular, we discuss the potential impact of each of the nine cultural dimensions that were established by the Global Leadership and Organizational Behavior Effectiveness Research Program, which is led by Robert J. House, on the decision to trade with or invest in another country. The analysis finds characterizations of source- and destination-country are important for each dimension when deciding between trade and FDI. Given the potentially conflicting recommendations, the dimensions are placed in a hierarchy to distinguish those most in need of consideration from those of secondary import.

Cite this paper

Mac-Dermott, R. and Mornah, D. (2015) The Role of Culture in Foreign Direct Investment and Trade: Expectations from the GLOBE Dimensions of Culture. Open Journal of Business and Management, 3, 63-74. doi: 10.4236/ojbm.2015.31007.

References

[1] Hufbauer, G.C., Moran, T.H., Oldenski, L. and Vieiro, M. (2013) Outward Foreign Direct Investment and US Exports, Jobs, and R&D: Implications for US Policy. Peterson Institute for International Economics, Washington DC.
[2] Moran, T.H. and Oldenski, L. (2013) Foreign Direct Investment in the United States: Benefits, Suspicions, and Risks with Special Attention to FDI from China. Peterson Institute for International Economics, Washington DC.
[3] Barro, R.J. and McCleary, R. (2003) Religions and Economic Growth. The National Bureau of Economic Research, Working Paper No. 9682.
[4] Tabellini, G. (2010) Culture and Institutions: Economic Development in the Regions of Europe. Journal of the European Economic Association, 8, 677-716.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1542-4774.2010.tb00537.x
[5] Easterly, W. (2006) Social Cohesion, Institutions and Growth. Center for Global Development, Working Paper No. 94.
[6] Linders, G., Slangen, A., de Groot, H. and Beugelsdijk, S. (2005) Cultural and Institutional Determinants of Bilateral Trade Flows. Tinbergen Institute Discussion Paper, TI 2005-074/3.
[7] Tadesse, B. and White, R. (2007) Cultural Distance as a Determinant of Bilateral Trade Flows: Do Immigrants Counter the Effect of Cultural Differences? Applied Economic Letters, 17, 147-152.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13504850701719983
[8] Cyrus, T. (2012) Cultural Distance and Bilateral Trade. Global Economy Journal, 12.
[9] Kogut, B. and Singh, H. (1988) The Effect of National Culture on the Choice of Entry Mode. Journal of International Business Studies, 19, 411-432. http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/palgrave.jibs.8490394
[10] Benito, G. and Gripsrud, G. (1992) The Expansion of Foreign Direct Investments: Discrete Rational Location Choices or a Cultural Learning Process? Journal of International Business Studies, 23, 461-476. http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/palgrave.jibs.8490275
[11] Chakrabarti, R., Gupta-Mukherjee, S. and Jayaraman, N. (2009) Mars-Venus Marriages: Culture and Cross-Border M&A. Journal of International Business Studies, 40, 216-236.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/jibs.2008.58
[12] Eichengreen, B. and Irwin, D. (1998) The Role of History in Bilateral Trade Flows. In: Frankel, J.A., Ed., The Regionalization of the World Economy, University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 33-62.
[13] De Groot, H.L., Linders, G.J., Rietveld, P. and Subramanian, U. (2004) The Institutional Determinants of Bilateral Trade Patterns. Kyklos, 57, 103-123.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.0023-5962.2004.00245.x
[14] Head, T. and Sorensen, P. (2005) Attracting Foreign Direct Investment: The Potential Role of National Culture. Journal of American Academy of Business, 6, 305-308.
[15] House, R.J., Hanges, P.J., Javidan, M., Dorfman, P.W. and Gupta, V. (2004) Culture, Leadership and Organizations: The GLOBE Study of 62 Societies. Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks.
[16] Hofstede, G. (2001) Culture’s Consequences. Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks.
[17] Triandis, H.C. (1995) Individualism and Collectivism. Westview Press, Boulder.                           eww150120lx

Mindset Shaping by Media: An Overview of Media Technologies Leading towards Media Imperialism in Media Mix

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http://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperInformation.aspx?PaperID=53265#.VLiDtcnQrzE

ABSTRACT

When medium itself has become message and gets disproportionate importance, the substance of the message gets pushed back. Influence of visual media on culture and people has been increasing day by day. Though it influences people both positively and negatively, it affects more adversely than otherwise as the media has begun affecting the very identity of the masses and reduced them to passive subjects. The plurality of culture and identity of people in the third world countries are at stake. Strong resistance of the masses supported by a new order of international information is the need of the hour. Keeping this in mind, a revisit to the influence of visual media is deliberated here.

Cite this paper

Parashar, A. and Sreenivasan, G. (2015) Mindset Shaping by Media: An Overview of Media Technologies Leading towards Media Imperialism in Media Mix. Social Networking, 4, 17-21. doi: 10.4236/sn.2015.41002.

References

[1] Jwal, B., Jolls, T. and Sund, M.A. (2008) Global/Local: Media Literacy for the Global Village. Center for Media Library, London.
[2] Chomsky, N. (1997) What Makes Mainstream Media Mainstream. Z Media Institute Magazine, June 1997. http://www.historyisaweapon.com/defcon1/bernprop.html
[3] Bernays, E.L. (1928) Propaganda. H. Liveright, University of Michigan.
[4] Lippmann, W. (1998) Public Opinion. Transaction Publishers, London.
[5] Stathakis, G. (2008) Imperialism: Old and New Theories. International Journal of Economic Sciences and Applied Research, University Crete, 100-124.
[6] Paterson, C. (1997) Global Television News Services, Media in Global Context: A Reader. Oxford University Press.
[7] Herman, E.S. and McChesney, R.W. (1997) The Global Media: The New Missionaries of Global Capitalism. Cassell, London.
[8] Simonton, D.K. (2001) The Story of Creativity: Historical Perspectives and Interpretations. Green College Lecture Series on the Nature of Creativity: History Biology, and Socio-Cultural Dimensions, University of British Columbia. http://psychology.ucdavis.edu/faculty_sites/simonton/HistoryCreativity.pdf
[9] Alter, A.L. and Kwan, V.S.Y. (2009) Cultural Sharing in Global Village; Evidence of Extra Cultural Cognition in European American. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 96, 742-760. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0014036                                                                                                                        eww150116lx

Sociocultural-Interdeterminist Dialogical Perspective of Intercultural Mutual Understanding Comprehension Deepening

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http://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperInformation.aspx?PaperID=49872#.VJD-NsnQrzE

Author(s)

Vladimir Yanchuk*

Affiliation(s)

Department of Psychology, Belarus State University, Minsk, Belarus.

ABSTRACT

Sociocultural-interdeterminist dialogical approach focuses attention on the caused interdeteministic character of mutual relations of situational, personal and activity determinants of the behaviour, staticized in concrete historical cultural context. For example, a change in a situational context leads to changes both in the person, and in his or her activity. Achievement of changes in the person and his or her activity assumes creation of the special conditions promoting to their actualization, etc. For understanding of the nature of progress in culture and science the theoretical construct “cultural-scientific tradition” is offered, allowing to trace changes in common cultural and scientific worldview throughout the human history. Consideration of personality problems is carried out in a three-dimensional continuum conscious-unconscious-existential, allowing to capture all variety of displays of psychological phenomenology. Proceeding from understanding of culture as orientational and normative structure of behaviour and as communicative matrix by means of which the behaviour is interpreted, integrated, coordinated and authorized (R. Priest), efficiency of use of the conceptual device of the epistemic approach of Michel Foucault and cultural framing of E. Goffman to understanding of intercultural interaction specificity is proved. The epistemic differences of European (graphic), Chinese, and classic Arabic languages are demonstrated. Intercultural competence is considered in aspect of ability of formation of shared meanings and experiences on the basis of mastering by knowledge about originalities of language, values and norms, experiences and behavioral algorithms of each other. The basis of such mutual understanding creates the dialogue that assumes unconditional acceptance of another based on tolerance and pluralism, the joint extension of the horizons directed on formation and development of coordinated and mutually endured values and senses. As unit of the analysis of intercultural interaction the evaluation of a sharedness of meanings and experiences is offered. Results of empirical research of the given approach on the example of formation of interpersonal mutual understanding of the Belarus and Chinese students are presented.

KEYWORDS

Cultural Competence, Cultural Framing, Culture, Cross-Cultural Comparison, Dialog, Ecocultural Dialogical Educational Environment, Episteme, Epistemology, Emic, Ethic, Framing, Interdetermination, Integration, Intgrative-Eclectic Approach, Integrative Eclectic through Triangulation, Intersubjectivity, Intertextuality, Mutual Understanding, Shared Meaning, Sociocultural-Interdeterminist Dialogical Approach

Cite this paper

Yanchuk, V. (2014) Sociocultural-Interdeterminist Dialogical Perspective of Intercultural Mutual Understanding Comprehension Deepening. Open Journal of Social Sciences, 2, 178-191. doi: 10.4236/jss.2014.28025.

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Female Genital Cut in Relation to Its Value and Health Risks among the Kisii of Western Kenya

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http://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperInformation.aspx?PaperID=49365#.VI5ZDcnQrzE

ABSTRACT

Background: The practice of female genital cutting as a cultural obligation is widespread in Kenya but there is little consensus about its effects on health. Some of the health risks associated with female genital cut range from minor and short-term to major and long-term effects including pain, bleeding, infections, and, in the extreme, death. Female genital cut is widespread among the Kisii but there is no adequate information about how it is currently practised and the value people attach to it. Objective: The objective was to establish the value of female genital cut as well as the health risks associated with the practice among the Kisii community of western Kenya. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study, which employed a mixed method approach to generate both quantitative and qualitative data. The quantitative data were obtained from a randomly selected sample of 373 respondents while quantitative data were generated from focus group discussions as well as key informants interviews. Results: The Kisii consider female genital cut a cultural identifier inherited from past generations and whose main value is a rite of passage from girlhood to womanhood. Majority (63%) had heard of the health risks associated with female genital cut including transmission of infections, excessive bleeding and pain. But most of the community did not seem to know the long-term health consequences associated with female genital cut. Even though knowledge on the campaigns to eradicate the practice was found to be wide spread, the community’s response toward the campaigns was less than positive. Conclusions: The authors conclude that female genital cut continues to persist in this community because of its value as a rite of passage, which currently has no substitute. This cultural demand by far outweighs the health risks associated with female genital cut, which are being mitigated through medicalization of the practice. For intervention programmes to succeed a more culturally sensitive campaign that is acceptable or appropriate alternative rite of passage is required.

Cite this paper

Okemwa, P. , Maithya, H. and Ayuku, D. (2014) Female Genital Cut in Relation to Its Value and Health Risks among the Kisii of Western Kenya. Health, 6, 2066-2080. doi: 10.4236/health.2014.615240.

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