Teachers’ Learning Activities in the Workplace: How Does Teacher Education Matter?

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ABSTRACT

The ability of teachers to learn and develop at work is important for the quality of their performance and their well-being. However, research has been ambiguous about what factors can improve it. Two reasons for this ambiguity are discussed in this paper: The links between workplace learning and professional education have often not been included in research studies, and teaching may have special characteristics that make workplace learning difficult. The paper examines new empirical connections between teachers’ learning activities at work and the outcome of teacher education, using longitudinal Norwegian survey data. The results show that an active and independent study strategy increases the likelihood of consulting professionals outside work and finding information in books and journals. Furthermore, the introduction of individual characterristics substantially improves the work place impact models, and should be adopted in future research. Finally, it is discussed whether the methodological framework in existing research on teachers’ work place learning is consistent with the theoretical point of departure, or whether greater consistency should be sought.

Cite this paper

Caspersen, J. (2015) Teachers’ Learning Activities in the Workplace: How Does Teacher Education Matter?. Creative Education, 6, 46-63. doi: 10.4236/ce.2015.61004.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/B:RIHE.0000015692.88534.de                                               eww150115lx

University-Employer Cooperation

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ABSTRACT

University-employer cooperation is one of the most important forms of cooperation in the economy, needed for economic development and sustainable growth and has become a key emphasis in higher education policy in recent years. The main goal is to achieve an equal partnership between universities and employers aimed at strengthening of economic development at the national, regional and local level. This goal can be achieved through active support (in information and knowledge) of local businesses and entrepreneurship in developing and realization of their ideas, and by linking students with their future employers, through various employer-seeking students associations and employers associations. Authors will analyze the university-employer cooperation in Poland, United Kingdom and Croatia and try to give an answer if the current cooperation is satisfying, and if is not, how it can be enhanced.

Cite this paper

Šehu, E. & Dobrić, D. (2014). University-Employer Cooperation. Beijing Law Review, 5, 272-282. doi: 10.4236/blr.2014.54026.

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Enriching Stakeholder Theory: Student Identity of Higher Education

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Author(s)

ABSTRACT

While students commonly assume the identity of being key stakeholders of higher education, the present article explores the possible complications stemmed from such key identity. Stakeholder theory has its strengths attributed by its conceptual breath and versatility; the limits of the theory arise for the same merit. Making reference to the theory with no restrains leads reasonably to the conclusion that the educational institute is unwilling to take measure closely to the long term effect, tangible or intangible, of such approach. Providing multiple perspectives on the identity of students are observed, an enrichment of stakeholder theory catering student identity is necessary.

Cite this paper

Lau, J. (2014) Enriching Stakeholder Theory: Student Identity of Higher Education. American Journal of Industrial and Business Management, 4, 762-766. doi: 10.4236/ajibm.2014.412082.

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[7] Seeman, E.D. and O’Hara, M. (2006) Customer Relationship Management in Higher Education: Using Information Systems to Improve the Student-School Relationship. Campus-Wide Information Systems, 23, 24-34. http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/10650740610639714
[8] Singh, G. (2002) Educational Consumers or Educational Partners: A Critical Theory Analysis. Critical Perspectives on Accounting, 13, 681-700. http://dx.doi.org/10.1006/cpac.2002.0552
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[10] Hill, F.M. (1995) Managing Service Quality in Higher Education: The Identity of the Student as Primary Consumer. Quality Assurance in Education, 3, 10-21. http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/09684889510093497
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbusres.2007.01.020                                                                           eww141224lx

Solution Focused Brief Therapy Applied to Diverse Classroom Settings in a Four-Year University

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http://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperInformation.aspx?PaperID=51918#.VHu8NGfHRK0

Author(s)

ABSTRACT

Solution Focused Brief Therapy was developed during the late 1970s and 1980s by Steve de Shazer and his colleagues. The purpose of this paper was to examine the application of Solution Focused Brief Therapy’s parallels with the author’s classroom experiences in a higher education setting that gave special considerations to the author’s disciplines of sociology, critical thinking, and marriage and family therapy. More specifically, the unique experiences are brought to a classroom by students much in the same manner that individuals bring experiences to a therapist who practices Solution Focused Brief Therapy. The author concludes that the perception of what constitutes a problem can be expressed as a limitation, not just merely defined as a problem.

Cite this paper

Perry, C. (2014) Solution Focused Brief Therapy Applied to Diverse Classroom Settings in a Four-Year University. Creative Education, 5, 1943-1946. doi: 10.4236/ce.2014.522218.

References

[1] Bateson, G. (1972). Steps to an Ecology of Mind: Collected Essays in Anthropology, Psychiatry, Evolution, and Epistemology. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.
[2] Berg, I. K. (1996). Solution-Building Conversations: Co-Constructing a Sense of Competence with Clients. Families in Society, 77, 376-391.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1606/1044-3894.934
[3] Cade, B. (2007). Springs, Streams, and Tributaries: A History of the Brief, Solution-Focused Approach. In T. Nelson & F. Thomas (Eds.), Handbook of Solution-Focused Brief Therapy.
[4] De Shazer, S. (1994). Words Were Originally Magic. New York: Norton.
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[6] Iveson, C. (2002). Solution-Focused Brief Therapy. Journal of Continuing Professional Development, 8, 149-156.
[7] Newsome, W. S. (2004). Solution-Focused Brief Therapy Groupwork with At-Risk Junior High School Students: Enhancing the Bottom Line. Research on Social Work Practice, 14, 336-343.
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[8] Smock, S., Trepper, T., Wetchler, J., McCollum, E., Ray, R., & Pierce, K. (2008). Solution Focused Group Therapy for Level 1 Substance Abusers. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 34, 107-120.
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[9] Visser, C. F. (2013). The Origin of Solution-Focused Approach. International Journal of Solution-Focused Practice, 1, 10-17.
http://dx.doi.org/10.14335/ijsfp.v1i1.10                                                                                   eww141201lx

HEIs-Regions Engagement Using Knowledge Management Strategy

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http://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperInformation.aspx?PaperID=47103#.VGFrJWfHRK0

Author(s)

ABSTRACT

Historically, the higher education system was the first knowledge industry. Today however, it no longer stands alone, but is one knowledge industry among many. Now, more than ever before, there is a stronger cooperation between the academia and industry, due to interdisciplinary activities, and because R & D activities are not limited to universities, but performed by industry too. Thus, new knowledge is created not only in universities and research institutes, but also in industry. Also, the implementation of knowledge develops not only in industry, but also within the academia. This means that the boundaries between industrial and academic research have been blurred. However, in spite of this fact, we still have not witnessed the breakthrough that we have been anticipating so keenly. It is highly important that policy leaders and decision makers in both the academia and industry should use “knowledge tools” for better communication between them. In industry, the tremendous value of knowledge strategy for business sustainability has already been realized. But while knowledge management tools that are suited to the current knowledge world have been implemented in industry for some time now, universities have not yet done so.

Cite this paper

Perry, M. (2014) HEIs-Regions Engagement Using Knowledge Management Strategy. Modern Economy, 5, 742-750. doi: 10.4236/me.2014.57068.

References

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[21] Serban, A.M. and Luan, J., Eds. (2002) Knowledge Management: Building a Competitive Advantage in Higher Education. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco.                                                                                                      eww141111lx

What Is the Training of the Accounting Professor in Brazil?

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http://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperInformation.aspx?PaperID=47146#.VGAkmWfHRK0

ABSTRACT

The aim this research is to demonstrate the structure of the Higher Education in Brazil with emphasis in Accounting Education and the college Education of the professor in this field of knowledge. It reports the aspects of college education of the accounting professor from the standpoint of Vasconcelos’ model (1994) dividing it into four fields of education: practical training, technical scientific, pedagogical and, social and political. The gathering of the professors’ perceptions was carried out through an online questionnaire. The base of the analysis was in 383 answers, being 307 of the observations considered valid. The results were identified by using descriptive analysis. The research indicates, in this sample, that the accounting sciences professor in Brazil has predominantly a practical training formation lacking pedagogical preparation, which is the highlighted object in this study.

Cite this paper

Araujo, A. and Mello, R. (2014) What Is the Training of the Accounting Professor in Brazil?. Creative Education, 5, 886-899. doi: 10.4236/ce.2014.511102.

References

[1] Andere, M. A. (2007). Aspectos da Formação do Professor de Ensino Superior de Ciências Contábeis: Umaanálise dos Programas de Pós-graduação . Dissertation (Masters in Controlling and Accounting), São Paulo: Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Economia, Administração e Contabilidade de Ribeirão Preto.
[2] Andere, M. A., & Araujo, A. M. P. de (2008). Aspectos da formação do professor de ensino superior de ciênciascontábeis: Umaanálise dos programas de pós-graduação. Revista Contabilidade & Finanças (Printed), 19 , 91-102.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S1519-70772008000300008
[3] Cornachione Jr., E. B. (2004). Tecnologia da educação e cursos de ciênciascontábeis: Modeloscolaborativosvirtuais. Thesis (Free-Docency), São Paulo: Faculdade de Economia, Administração e Contabilidade, USP.
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[5] Delors, J. (1996). Educação, um tesouro a descobrir. Relatório para a UNESCO da Comissãointernacionalsobre Educação para o século XXI. (Original Title: Learning: The Treasure within; Report to UNESCO of the International Commission on Education for the Twenty-first Century (highlights)). Paris: UNESCO (Published by the Setor de Educação da Representação of UNESCO in Brasil, Sponsored by FundaçãoFaberCastell, Traslation: GuilhermeJoão de Freitas Teixeira)
http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0010/001095/109590por.pdf
[6] Delors, J. (1999) Um Tesouro a Descobrir. São Paulo: UNESCO, MEC, Cortez Editora.
[7] Feltran. R. C. S. (2002). Avaliaçãonaeducação superior . Campinas: Papirus Editora.
[8] Gil, A.C. (2002). Como elaborarprojetos de pesquisa (4th ed.). São Paulo: Editora Atlas.
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[12] Hernandes, D. C. R., et al. (2006). O professor de contabilidade: habilidades e competências. In I. R. Peleias (Org.), Didática do ensino superior da contabilidade: Aplicávela outros cursossuperiores (pp. 61-119). São Paulo: Saraiva.
[13] Laffin, M. (2002). De contador a professor: A trajetória da docência no ensino superior de contabilidade . Thesis (Doctorate in Production Engineering), Florianópolis: Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina.
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[17] Mello, R. R. de (1998). Os saberes docentes e a formação cotidiana nas series iniciais do ensino fundamental: Um estudo de casosmúltiplos de tipo etnográfico . PhD Thesis, São Carlos: Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Educação.
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Innovation and Evaluation in the Brazilian Higher Education Culture: Interdisciplinary and General Education

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http://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperInformation.aspx?PaperID=50786#.VE8L4FfHRK0

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to present partial results of the Interdisciplinary Higher Education Program (ProFIS) related to the interdisciplinary general education proposal, which represents an innovation in the Brazilian Higher Education culture. The general education provided by the program is concerned in preparing students with greater knowledge, critical sense by expanding their knowledge and culture, and makes them critical citizens and professionals. Besides curricular innovation, the course aims to establish a policy of affirmative action through the inclusion of public school students. Briefly, it presents the general education as curriculum emphasis adopted by universities in various parts of the world. Then, it presents the ProFIS proposal, its current development stage and the analysis of partial results of the evaluation process under development. The evaluation process is developed with teachers, students and course coordination.

Cite this paper

Pereira, E. , Carneiro, A. and Gonçalves, M. (2014) Innovation and Evaluation in the Brazilian Higher Education Culture: Interdisciplinary and General Education. Creative Education, 5, 1690-1701. doi: 10.4236/ce.2014.518188.

References

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[15] Zackiewicz, M. (2005). Trajectories and Challenges of Evaluation in Science, Technology and Innovation. PhD Thesis, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Instituto de Geociências.                                                 eww141028lx